Arthur Roadhouse: The Boy With No Legs Who Rode Like the Wind

Arthur Roadhouse I stumbled across this paragraph in St. Louis Globe-Democrat, from the August 22, 1895 issue ... After reading it, I just had to find out more about the 508-pound Baby Bliss (here’s the link to my story) and Arthur Roadhouse. “Here is the greatest of all bicycle freaks ...” This was the first … Continue reading Arthur Roadhouse: The Boy With No Legs Who Rode Like the Wind

Bicycle Toes, the Bicycle Nose & Throat, Bicycle Heart and the Dreaded Bicycle Leg – Are They Real?

My recent story on Bicycle Face is just the start of the numerous cycling-related maladies that afflicted wheelmen and wheelwomen in the 1890s. From the tops of their heads to the tips of their toes, these cyclist mangled, warped and ruined their bodies with every pedal stroke. Or, so it seemed, according to several prominent … Continue reading Bicycle Toes, the Bicycle Nose & Throat, Bicycle Heart and the Dreaded Bicycle Leg – Are They Real?

Why Did The Bicycle Cross the Road? And More Old Cycling Jokes …

Take my bike, please! Sorry, I couldn't resist. Here are several bike-themed jokes from the 1890s that I found ... They're anything but ordinary. Ethel: Maud has been trying to learn how to ride a bicycle for four weeks now. Penelope: Is her instructor stupid? Ethel: No – handsome. Freeland Tribune, Freeland, Pennsylvania, January 6, … Continue reading Why Did The Bicycle Cross the Road? And More Old Cycling Jokes …

How Teddy Hale Ate 162.5 Pounds Of Food & Rode 1,910 Miles In Six Days

Have you ever eaten an entire roasted chicken - or two - during a ride? Well then, you’ve probably never competed in a six-day bicycle race … in 1896. In Madison Square Garden. Teddy Hale (“the plucky and graceful Irishman”) won this epic 1896 race, covering 1,910 miles and eight laps … which equals a … Continue reading How Teddy Hale Ate 162.5 Pounds Of Food & Rode 1,910 Miles In Six Days